08:10 am
28 June 2017

Fourteen-Year Old Sandy Teen Sues Febreeze Because Mother Could Smell Weed

Fourteen-Year Old Sandy Teen Sues Febreeze Because Mother Could Smell Weed
While Febreeze is marketed to get rid of undesirable odors, Williamson says it got him in trouble by failing to eliminate the smell of marijuana.

It was a bad trip for Sandy teen Malcolm Williamson last Friday night.

“My mom came into my room, wrinkled her nose, looked at me and I knew I was in trouble,” Williamson says.

Williamson had been doing what many youth his age experiment with – smoking marijuana. While he knows he shouldn’t have been doing it, he also doesn’t think his mom needed to know about it, which is why he Febreezed his room and clothes afterward.

“There was no need for this to happen,” Williamson says. “This shouldn’t have happened – and that’s why I’m suing Febreeze.”

While Febreeze is marketed to get rid of undesirable odors, Williamson says it got him in trouble by failing to eliminate the smell of marijuana.

While Febreeze is marketed to get rid of undesirable odors, Williamson says it got him in trouble by failing to eliminate the smell of marijuana.

Febreeze, now a household name amongst the majority of Americans, markets itself on it’s ability to not merely mask odors but actually get rid of them. Since in this instance the product didn’t live up to this, Williamson’s lawyer says there is a good case here.

“The Federal Trade Commission prohibits unfair and deceptive practices in commerce,” David Cummings of the law firm Cummings and Pierce says. “When it doesn’t work the way they market it, then that constitutes false advertising. In this case, we have reason to believe Febreeze is guilty.”

The burden of proof, of course, is on Williamson. As evidence, he will provide the Febreeze bottle and bring a sample of fabric from his comforter that was sprayed. His friend, James Dunn, who participated in smoking and allegedly provided the marijuana, will also testify on behalf of Williamson. Dunn declined to comment his procuring role, but did hint that he’s just trying to be cool to his friend.

“It’s like, unfair, man,” Dunn said, eyes bloodshot. “It’s not cool, and we should all just be cool.”

In the meantime, Williamson says that preparing for the courtroom is difficult because he is still grounded. He also feels it is unfair that he is under scrutiny when there are other unanswered questions.

“What isn’t being asked is how mom even knew what weed smells like,” Williamson said.

Williamson’s mother declined to comment.

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